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Beautiful goldwork embroidery

Machine embroidery panel detail inspired by lichen

Textile greeting card using reverse applique techique

Machine contemporary quilt inspired by Ground Zero

Machine embroidery for Capability Brown exhibition

Winchester Embroiderers' Guild welcomes contemporary and traditional textile artists, embroiderers and craft enthusiasts

Workshop Reviews

Thirteen members enjoyed the workshop run by Zoe Hillyard. It concentrated on what was originally a Japanese repairing technique known as Boro. Boro links with Zoe’s Ceramic Patchwork because of the patching and piecing together, which was originally used for workwear. As rich Europeans we rarely repair garments, but Zoe taught us to appropriate the technique as a creative method.

We all brought our own selection of materials but Zoe generously supplemented this with her own collection of fabrics and threads, which we were delighted to delve into. The day went very quickly as we were totally absorbed, only breaking briefly for lunch. By the time we finished, all of us had interesting pieces to show and I’m sure that Zoe will be looking forward to being posted with their progress. 

We all left in high spirits, feeling our day had been enjoyably and productively spent - and Zoe made us feel that she had enjoyed herself too. I would highly recommend this workshop, thank you to our programme organisers.
N.B. I have a suspicion that we could look out for some Boro work sometime in the future from one of the YE groups too. I wonder if I’m right. Report by Jennifer.

The developed pieces were to shown at our meeting on April 12th and photos can be seen on Facebook or below.

Members work from Zoe Hillyard Workshop

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November 2016 at Dovetail Centre, Bar End, Winchester.

Twelve Guild members enjoyed a fabulous workshop last week with Alison Hulme. She had a huge range of thermofax stencils to use to screen print designs on fabric and a vast assortment of stencils and stamps for printing. Pots of colour (acrylic paint with textile medium) were available to mix up your own colour palette as well as mark-making tools to use on geli plates.

Eleven members took part in this smocking workshop and they all learnt how to use a smocking machine. The day began with an introduction to smocking machines, including a little bit about their history and then a practical demonstration about how the needles are put into the machine and then how to thread it. Jean then showed the group two ways to use the smocking machine, with a lightweight backing or ground fabric or without, but laying on strips of sheers and other lightweight material. The group were then let loose on the machines and spent the day threading needles and winding a selection of lightweight fabrics and other things into the smocking machines.

The group experimented feeding in all kinds of fabrics from sheers, scrims, organzas, lace and patterned fabrics with amazing, sometimes unexpected results. We discovered that the machines could smock thin plastic bags as well as paper. Some members found that if they turned the smocking machine too fast or attempted to put thicker fabrics or the bias edges of the fabric through they broke needles. Fortunately Jean was very understanding with us as we experimented and she did not keep a tally of broken needles! At the end of the day we had a show and tell session where we admired each others handiwork and Jean discussed possibilities of what we might do with our smocking creations. She strongly urged us not to condemn them to the rag bag and I look forward to seeing what the others make from all the pleating that we did.

Following the interesting talk give by Angie Hughes on the Wednesday, members had the chance to learn to make Tag books at either of the two workshop days. She introduced the day by showing members the different types of tags that could be made and showing how to make various types of backgrounds. Angie had masses of rubber stamps, ink pads and other goodies for members to try out and before lunch we were encouraged to complete 4 backgrounds for tags using the template she provided. After lunch we began decorating the tags using a range of techniques including adding paper images attached on to pelmet Vylene with Bondaweb, which could then be cut out and stuck on, adding machine stitch to decorate and couch on thicker threads and braids, adding card frames and tiny card tags, beads, sequens etc.

Fifteen members took part in this workshop and they all enjoyed the day. This is verified by the work produced.

Ruth discussed her work and the techniques used before setting us to work. After a technical hitch - hot weather had dried printer ink - we all set to on very personal and varied pieces of work. It is always interesting to see individual responses.

N.B. It would be lovely if everyone on the course could bring either their completed work, or a photograph of it, to our November meeting.